Our Advocacy Training Framework

Many law schools and Advocacy training institutions predominately employ the Hampel Method when providing Advocacy feedback to trainees. This is the method the Bar Standards Board prescribes to course training providers. It is also the method the Inns use on their Advocacy training programmes. 

 

The method was first developed by Professor George Hampel of the Australian Bar, the method recognises that Advocacy must be taught as a specialist technical skill. It requires that the trainer identifies a single key flaw in an Advocacy performance. Six steps are then employed to address and rectify that flaw. They are:

 

  • The Headline: identifying the problem

  • Playback: Repeating the problem verbatim

  • Reason: Explaining why the problem must be addressed

  • Remedy: Explaining how the problem can be improved

  • Demonstration: Showing the remedy at work

  • Replay: The student applies the remedy

 

Whilst the Hampel method provides a useful framework within which to deliver feedback, its emphasis on providing only one feedback point per performance can slow down a trainee’s development. In addition, the Hampel method provides little time for reflection, the trainee is expected to immediately replay the performance after receiving feedback from the trainer. 

 

Our method of training ensures that trainees receive in-depth feedback, in a constructive manner, conducive to learning.  In this way trainees make rapid progress in their Advocacy skills. 

 

You can expect to be trained by an experienced Barrister with substantial experience of providing Advocacy training. Your trainer will provide full oral and written feedback, following your Advocacy performance. 

 

We employ Actors to role-play witnesses for examination-in-chief and cross-examination training packages, thereby providing you with a realistic experience of conducting witness handling skills.

 

Tel:+44 20 7097 8557

Email: soniasimms@advocacytutor.com

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